Where to catch a glimpse of the whales on the Central Coast
Where to catch a glimpse of the whales on the Central Coast

Where to catch a glimpse of the whales on the Central Coast

Published on 24 Jun 2020

Each year, it is estimated that 33,000 humpback whales migrate from the Southern Ocean and travel up the east coast of Australia to warmer waters for the winter and return during spring to the cooler waters for the Summer. During this time, it is a spectacular sight to witness the whales on their journey from coastal headlands, lookouts and vantage points.

For Indigenous Australians, the Dharawal People, when the Gymea Lily began to flower, it was time to head to the coast to see the whales as they migrate north and when the flower began to die, it was time to sing the whales back south. It is such an interesting insight into Australia’s Indigenous history.

The whale migration season has well and truly begun this year and if you haven’t had a chance to yet, here are some of the best places on the Central Coast to catch a glimpse of these beautiful mammals.

Wybung Head

In the Munmorah State Conservation area at the very northern end of the Central Coast, Wybung Head is a great vantage point to see the whales. You can watch from the comfort and warmth of your car which is perfect during the winter months.

For more information, visit the NSW National Parks and Wildlife Service website.

(Image credit: Rhys Jones)

Norah Head Lighthouse

The Norah Head Lighthouse Reserve offers breathtaking views out over the ocean and is a great spot to see the humpbacks. Whilst you are there you can see the beautifully maintained Lighthouse that was built in 1903 and the historic keeper’s quarters which is available to book for short stay getaways.

Please note: Lighthouse tours are currently suspended due to COVID-19 restrictions but the grounds remain open to the public.

For more information, visit the Norah Head Lighthouse website.

Soldiers Point, Norah Head

At the northern end of Soldiers Beach at Norah Head is Soldiers Point. The headland offers uninterrupted 180-degree views of spectacular coastline, this is one of the best locations on the Central Coast to catch a glimpse of the whales.

Whilst in the area check out some of the local cafés, restaurants and boutiques.

Crackneck Lookout

Crackneck Lookout in Wyrrabalong National Park is a popular vantage point to see the whales as they cruise by. Offering stunning views north over Shelly Beach, The Entrance and beyond, the lookout is a perfect spot for a picnic on the grassy hill overlooking the ocean.

For more information, visit the NSW National Parks and Wildlife Service website.

(Image credit: Central Coast Drones)

The Skillion

The Skillion is an iconic landmark in Terrigal. The sedimentary rock formation is approximately 100 metres high with an easily accessible lookout. A hike to the top will reward you with breathtaking 360-degree views of golden sandy beaches to the north, rugged coastline to the south and over Terrigal towards the hinterland in the east.

Captain Cook Lookout

Captain Cook Lookout at Copacabana’s northland headland is also considered one of the best scenic lookouts on the Central Coast for whale watching due to its stunning expansive views.

(Image credit: David Ross)

Gerrin Point Lookout

Located just a short walk from Putty Beach in the Bouddi National Park, Gerrin Point Lookout offers panoramic views of Maitland Bay and the Bouddi National Park Marine Extension. Take a seat on the bench, admire the view and watch the whales as they play.

For more information, visit the NSW National Parks and Wildlife Service website.

Article written by:
Central Coast Council
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