Maitland Bay

Maitland Bay

The Best Secret Lookouts

Published on 13 Mar 2019
The secret spots getting thousands of views on the Central Coast.

These are the spots only the locals know about, the ones you never find on the glossy brochures. They’re off the beaten track and sometimes take a little more to get there, but they’re more than worth it when you do.

Wyrrabalong National Park

This is Mother Nature in all her glory. Watch the whales, throw in a line and fish, get in a surf, walk through the red gum forest, spot some of the birdlife and witness the rich Aboriginal heritage, it’s magical place. With a network of walking tracks, there are plenty of spots to park yourselves and have a picnic along the way. It’s about a 6km route to Wyrrabalong Lookout and back, with spectacular views when you get there and even a spot to launch a hang glider close by. See map to get directions.

Staples Lookout

See Woy Woy Bay from this angle and it’ll put Woy Woy in an entirely new perspective. It’s majestically scenic with an endless gaze across the expanse of Brisbane Water and Woy Woy Bay. Look southwest and you can see all the way to Mount Wondabyne, the highest point in Brisbane Water National Park. It’s a good idea to bring a pair of binoculars with several rare bird species living in the area. Try to find a spotted-tailed quoll or a yellow-tailed black cockatoo.  You can also break out the picnic with many picnic tables available, taking in outstanding views of this national park as your backdrop. See map to get directions.

Maitland Bay

This is one of the sparkling gems of Bouddi National Park. And you can only get to it with a 15-minute bushwalk, making your way along the beautiful Maitland Bay Track. Maitland Bay is within a stunning arc of secluded coastline. When the forest walk opens out into Maitland Bay, you might find the PS Maitland, shipwrecked in 1898, high and dry in the eastern corner on low tide. It’s worth taking your snorkelling gear for a dip in the pristine waters and some amazing marine life. When it’s time to leave, you can always take the easy route back to Putty Beach, which is another great spot for a swim. See map to get directions.

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Gerrin Lookout

Warrah Lookout

The views here will make your eyes water. Warrah Lookout lets you see for miles across Patonga, Broken Bay, the head of the Hawkesbury River, Barrenjoey Head off in the distance and the majestic Pacific Ocean. Eucalypts tower above, waves lap on shore below, all manner of seafaring vessels pass by.  And in later winter, you can witness the fiery red bloom of our state emblem, the Warratah. See map to get directions.

Monkey Face

BYO binoculars and long lens cameras. Monkey Face gives you one of the best vantage spots in the National Park with sweeping views across the Martinsville Valley. It’s also known for the glossy black cockatoos often seen here so keep an eye out and your binoculars handy. There are plenty of spots to picnic alongside the magnificent Ironbarks and ancient grass trees, and take in the fresh forest air. You can also stay the night if you like at the Monkey Face Lookout Cottage Watagans with ample sleeping quarters and a large wood fire to sit back and relax by. See map to get directions.

Gerrin Lookout

Anywhere along the Bouddi National Park’s coastal walk is spectacular but from Gerrin Point you get exceptional views of Maitland Bay and beyond. The lookout is an easy walk from the eastern end of Putty Beach, about 1.2km along the boardwalk and up the stairs. You’ll find a bench built into the lookout giving you a nice place to chill out after a good walk. It’s also one of the better spots to see migrating whales during season. You might like to bring a jacket as it can get a little windy and it’s a good idea to wear joggers or hiking shoes when you visit Bouddi, as the ground is uneven in areas. See map to get directions.

 

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Staples Lookout
Article written by:
@VisitCentralCoastNSW from Central Coast Council
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